mialoveshenrymiller – Letter 43 – Salacious Sounding Hooves, Pony Girl Boots, Leather Muzzles, and Pony Walks at Dawn in the Park

mialoveshenrymiller

Letter 43 – Salacious Sounding Hooves, Pony Girl Boots, Leather Muzzles, and  Pony Walks at Dawn in the Park

I’m writing this letter at 3/18/2012 at 9:42 P.M.

Dear Henry,

“Every novelist must start with empathy and with a great curiosity about people.  In many ways, those qualities are even more important than language – important as language is. Henry was fascinated with people – with the nuts, the clowns, the destitute refuse of life.” –Erica Jong on Henry Miller, The Devil at Large

When I begin each letter, I often daydream of you, still living in Big Sur, getting your large stack of mail, filtering through it, and imagining your eyes light up with surprise and elation when you see an envelope from me.  And, I fantasize that you are genuinely excited to read one of my letters.

We had a long day, yesterday.  For a majority of this morning and early afternoon, my stepdaughter and I rested, watching a movie on cable, to recharge after performing magic in our very first vaudeville show.  The Illusionettes had a great time!  I have always wanted to do that.  I love the history of vaudeville.  The theater was in an edgy, yet historic part of St. Paul.  We definitely weren’t on Summit Avenue where Scott Fitzgerald once lived.  We were at the Mounds Theater, where people of all walks of life, gathered outside in the run down, older neighborhood.  I saw clowns inside the theater and “nuts” outside of it.  I observed a sneaky, quiet, prostitution deal occur right outside the theater, a big burly guy puking up green beer in the street, and people dressed head to toe in green attire, hooting, and cheering, laughing and drinking green beer a half a block down from the theater.  It was St. Patty’s Day.  St. Paul is full of Irish people and they love to celebrate it!  Occasionally, someone would pass by and say to those of us sitting on a short, cement wall, just outside the theater, having a cigarette, “Hey, you know… that theater is haunted.”  I already knew this from previously performing at this theater, and welcomed the haunting.  But, I never witnessed any ghostly evidence to make me believe this theater is haunted. Continue reading

mia loves henry miller – Letter 42 – A Shopping trip to Victoria Secrets and Another Fun and Kinky Party at MJ’s

mia loves henry miller

Letter 42 – A Shopping trip to Victoria Secrets and Another Fun and Kinky Party at MJ’s

I’m writing this letter on 3-11-12 at 4:04 p.m.

Dear Henry,

“When I say friends, I mean friends.  Not everybody can be your friend. It must someone as close to you as your skin, someone who imparts color, drama, meaning to your life, however snug and secure it may be.” –Henry Miller, A Trilogy

Our clocks sprang forward by one hour sometime during the night – Daylight Savings.  Mr. C and I didn’t arrive home from MJ’s party until after 2 am.   I had to get up at eight this morning to get ready to take my mother out for breakfast for her 70th birthday.   Afterwards, I’ve been so tired, that I have been dozing in and out of sleep on the couch all day, after working and revising my last letter to you, organizing the next burlesque show, and editing my manuscript. Continue reading

mia loves henry miller – Letter 41 – Exotic World, Roof Top Parties at the Palms Casino, Desert Secrets, Tempest Winds and Dusty Summers

mia loves henry miller

Letter 41 – Exotic World, Roof Top Parties at the Palms Casino, Desert Secrets, Tempest Winds and Dusty Summers

I’m writing this letter on 3/3/2112 at 8:47 p.m. (The Saturday morning after a burlesque show)

Dear Henry,

“One’s destination is never a place, but a new way of seeing things.” –Henry Miller

Yesterday was a very busy day!  We had an amazing show last night!  I’m totally exhausted.  My body feels limp, fatigued and rubbery.   My mind feels spacey like my brain is made of Swiss cheese.  I don’t want to do anything today, but rest on the couch and watch a movie.  But, it’s a good kind of tired – a very rewarding type of exhaustion.  Dr. Farrago’s Burlesque Theater troupe is an amazing burlesque/variety show production. I am still feeling the euphoric rush after a great show.

The Illusionettes, Nikki Malone and I performed well on stage last night.  Sadie Simone couldn’t perform with us because of other job obligations.  Due to being one performer short, we kept our magic number simple, yet, sexy and fun.   And, I even managed to perform a slinky, sexy burlesque striptease number to Adele’s song, Rumor Has It.  I loved feeling glamorous and provocative performing the art of the striptease art in a semi classic, yet modern style. Continue reading

mia loves henry miller – Letter 40 – Daring, Dangerous Barney Rosset, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, and Sizzling, Sapphire Kisses

mia loves henry miller

Letter 40 – Daring, Dangerous Barney Rosset, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, and Sizzling, Sapphire Kisses

I’m writing this letter on 2/25/2-12 at 8:03 a.m.

Dear Henry Miller,

“Rosset’s publishing house, Grove Press, was a tiny company operating out of the ground floor of Rosset’s brownstone when it published an obscure play called “Waiting for Godot” in 1954.  By the time Beckett had won the Nobel Prize in 1969, Grove had become a force that challenged and changed literature and American culture in deep and lasting ways. Its impact is still evident—from the Che Guevara posters adorning college dorms to the canonical status of the house’s once controversial authors. Rosset is less well known—but late in his life he is achieving some wider recognition. Last month, a black-tie crowd gave Rosset a standing ovation when the National Book Foundation awarded him the Literarian Award for “outstanding service” to American letters. This fall, Rosset was also the subject of a documentary, “Obscene,” directed by Neil Ortenberg and Daniel O’Connor, which featured a host of literary luminaries, former colleagues and footage from a particularly hilarious interview with Al Goldstein, the porn king. High literature and low—Rosset pushed and published it all.”  –Louisa Thomas, The DailyBeast.com, Newsweek Magazine

Good Morning Henry!  I’m still at my artist loft, getting ready to paint.  I just learned that Barney Rosset, the renowned owner of Grove press recently died.  According to the Daily Beast at Newsweek Magazine, Barney Rosset was the most dangerous man in publishing.  I feel gratitude for this amazing, daring gentleman who paved the way for so many writers who did not fit into a safe, vanilla box.  I admire how he and Grove Press battled court fights for the once banned in America publication, Henry Miller’s Tropic of Cancer and published many of Anais Nin’s work.  Grove Press also published D. H. Lawrence’s Lady Chatterley’s Lover and Pauline Reage’s The Story of O.   Barney Rosset also published authors like Samuel Beckett, who, according to Win McCormack’s blog, Tin House Publishing, Mr. Rosset was very close to Samuel.  Barney Rosset was highly respected by a myriad of writers who have dared to write about sex and other edgy controversial topics.  He will be missed.  I wish I could have met him. Continue reading